The Orlando Probate Lawyer
The Coleman Law Firm, PLLC
Main Office
10161 Centurion Parkway, N., Suite 310
Jacksonville, FL  32256
Telephone Toll Free 866-510-9099
Email:  Info@TheOrlandoProbateLawyer.com

Orlando Probate Attorneys and Lawyers

Probate in Florida

Orlando Probate lawyers and attorneys for Orange County, and throughout Florida have been involved with assisting personal representatives and beneficiaries in the probate of estates in  Florida area for over 35 years.

What is probate administration in Florida?

Probate in Orlando, and Orange County, Florida is governed by chapters 731-735 of the Florida Statutes
, known as The Florida Probate Code.

1. WHAT IS PROBATE? 

Florida probate is a court-supervised process for identifying and gathering the decedent's assets, paying taxes, claims and expenses and distributing assets to beneficiaries. The Florida Probate Code is found in Chapters 731 through 735 of the Florida Statutes.

Florida probate law establishes two types of probate administration:

    1. Formal probate Administration, with which most of this information deals and

    2. Summary Probate Administration, which is involved when the Florida probate estate is less than $75,000 in value (less exempt property) or the decedent has been dead for more than two years.

Florida probate law also establishes a non-administration proceeding called "Disposition of Personal Property Without Administration."

If you need the assistance of a Orlando probate attorney for your Orlando, Florida probate matter, whether formal administration or summary administration, please contact us toll free at 866-510-9099 or email at
Info@TheOrlandoProbateLawyer.com.

2. WHAT ARE FLORIDA PROBATE ASSETS?  

Generally,
Florida probate assets are those assets in the decedent's sole name at death or otherwise owned solely by the decedent and which contain no provision for automatic succession of ownership at death. For example:

    • a bank account in the sole name of a decedent is a Florida probate asset, but a bank account held in-trust-for (ITF) another, or held jointly with rights of survivorship (JTWROS) with another, is not a Flroida probate asset;

    • a life insurance policy, annuity or individual retirement account that is payable to a specific beneficiary is not a Florida probate asset, but a policy payable to the decedent's estate is a Florida probate asset;

    • real estate titled in the sole name of the decedent or as a tenant in common with another person, is a Florida probate asset (unless it is exempt Florida homestead) but real estate held as joint tenants with rights of survivorship or as tenants by the entirety is not a Florida probate asset;

    • property owned by husband and wife as tenants by the entirety is not a Florida probate asset on the death of the first spouse to die, but goes automatically to the surviving spouse.

This list is not exclusive but is intended to be illustrative.

3. WHY IS PROBATE NECESSARY IN FLORIDA? 

Probate is necessary in Florida to wind up the affairs the decedent leaves behind. It ensures that all of the decedent’s creditors are properly paid. Florida probate also serves to transfer assets from the decedent's individual name to the proper beneficiary. Florida has had probate laws in force since becoming a state in 1845. Florida law provides for all aspects of the probate process, but allows the decedent to make certain decisions by leaving a valid last will and testament.

4. WHAT IS A LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT?  

A last will and testament is a writing, signed by the decedent and witnesses, which meets formal requirements set forth by
Florida probate law. A last will and testament usually designates a personal representative to administer the Orlando, Florida probate estate and names beneficiaries to receive probate assets. A last will and testament can also do other things, including establishing a testamentary trust and designating a trustee.

To the extent a last will and testament properly devises the Florida probate assets and designates a personal representative, the last will and testament controls over the automatic provisions set forth under
Florida probate law. In the absence of a valid last will and testament, or if the will fails in either respect, Florida probate law designates the beneficiaries of the probate estate and designates the way to select the personal representative.

If you need an experienced Florida probate attorney to assist you with a probate estate matter in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

5. WHAT HAPPENS TO FLORIDA PROBATE ASSETS IF THERE IS NO LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT?
 

What happens if I die without a will?

Contrary to the belief of some, the Orlando decedent’s Florida probate assets are not turned over to the State of
Florida unless no intestate heirs can be found. If there is no last will and testament, the assets of the decedent will be distributed to the intestate heirs  pursuant to the Florida intestacy statute as follows: 

    • Surviving Spouse and No Lineal Descendants. If there is a surviving spouse and no lineal descendants, the surviving spouse takes all of the Florida probate estate.

    • Surviving spouse and lineal descendants.

 
        1. If there is a surviving spouse and one or more lineal descendants (with the lineal descendants all being the lineal descendants of the surviving spouse as well as the decedent), the surviving spouse receives the first $60,000 of the Florida probate estate plus one-half of the rest of the probate estate, and the lineal descendants share the remaining half of the Florida probate estate.

        2. If there is a surviving spouse and one or more lineal descendants (one or more of which lineal descendants are not also lineal descendants of the surviving spouse), the surviving spouse receives one-half of the Florida probate assets and the lineal descendants share the remaining half of the Florida probate estate.

    • No Surviving Spouse, But Lineal Descendants. If there is no surviving spouse, but there are lineal descendants, the lineal descendants share the Florida probate estate, which is initially broken into shares at the children's level, with a deceased child's share going to the descendants of that deceased child.

    • No Surviving Spouse, No Lineal Descendants. If the decedent left no surviving spouse or lineal descendants, the probate property goes to the decedent's surviving parents, and if none, then to the decedent's brothers and sisters and descendants of any deceased brothers or sisters. The Florida intestacy statute law provides for further disposition if the decedent is survived by none of these.

    • Exceptions to Above. The above provisions are subject to certain exceptions for Florida exempt homestead property, exempt personal property, and a statutory allowance to the surviving spouse and any lineal descendants or ascendants the decedent supported. Regarding exempt Florida homestead, if titled in the decedent's name alone, the surviving spouse receives a life estate in the exempt Florida homestead, with the lineal descendants of the deceased spouse receiving the Florida exempt homestead property upon the death of the surviving spouse. If there are no lineal descendants, the surviving spouse receives full ownership of the exempt Florida homestead outright.

If you need an experienced Florida probate lawyer to assist you with the probate of an intestate estate in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

6. WHO IS INVOLVED IN THE FLORIDA PROBATE PROCESS? 

While there may be others, the following is a list of persons or entities often involved in the probate process:

    • Clerk of the Circuit Court (See Question 7) for Orange County, Florida, in Orlando, Florida, or such county as the decedent was residing at the time of his or her death.

    • Circuit Court for Orange County, Florida (acting through a Circuit Court Judge, See Question 8).

    • Personal Representative of the Orlando, Florida probate estate (See Questions 9 through 11).

    • Florida Probate
Attorney for the Personal Representative (See Question 12).

    • Claimants (See Question 13).

    • Internal Revenue Service (IRS) (See Question 14).

    • Florida Department of Revenue (See Question 15).

    • Surviving Spouse and Children (See Question 16).

    • Other Beneficiaries of the Florida Probate Estate (See Question 17).

    • Trustee of Revocable Trust (See Question 21).

7. WHERE ARE PROBATE PAPERS FILED IN FLORIDA? 

Probate papers are filed with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court
, for Orange County, Florida, or in the county where the decedent lived. A probate filing fee must be paid to the Orange County probate clerk to commence the Florida probate administration. The probate clerk assigns a file number and maintains a docket sheet which lists all probate papers filed with the clerk for that probate administration.

In a typical probate case, what documents are filed first with the probate court.

8. WHO SUPERVISES THE FLORIDA PROBATE ADMINISTRATION?  

A
Circuit Court Judge
presides over Florida probate proceedings. The probate judge appoints the personal representative and issues "letters of administration," also referred to simply as "letters." This probate document shows to the world the authority of the personal representative to act on behalf of the probate estate. The Florida probate Judge also holds hearings when necessary and resolves all questions raised during the administration of the estate by entering written directions called "orders."

9. WHAT IS A PERSONAL  REPRESENTATIVE, AND WHAT DOES THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE DO?

The personal representative is the person, bank or trust company appointed by the
Florida probate court to be in charge of the administration of the probate estate. The generic term "personal representative" has replaced such terms as "executor, executrix, administrator and administratrix."

The personal representative is directed by the Florida probate court to administer the probate estate pursuant to Florida probate law. The personal representative is obligated to:

    • Identify, gather, value and safeguard Florida probate assets.

    • Publish a "notice to creditors" in a local newspaper, giving notice to file with the Florida probate court claims and other probate papers relating to the probate estate. 

    • Serve a "notice of administration" on specific persons, giving information about the probate estate administration and giving notice of requirements to file with the probate court any objections relating to the probate estate.

    • Conduct a diligent search to locate "known or reasonably ascertainable" creditors, and notify them of the time by which their claims must be filed with the Florida probate court.

    • Object to improper claims and defend suits brought on such claims in the Orlando, Florida probate court.

    • Pay valid claims.

    • File tax returns, including, if necessary the Federal Estate Tax Return (Form 706).

    • Pay taxes.

    • Employ necessary probate professionals to assist the personal representative in the probate administration.

    • Pay administrative expenses.

    • Distribute statutory amounts or assets to the surviving spouse or family.

    • Distribute assets to beneficiaries of the probate estate.

    • Close probate administration.

If you need an experienced and qualified Florida probate lawyer to represent you as personal representative of a probate estate in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

10. WHO CAN BE A PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE?  

    • The personal representative of the Orlando, Florida probate estate could be an individual, bank, or trust company, subject to certain restrictions.

    • An individual who is either a resident of
Florida, or is a spouse, sibling, parent, child, or certain other close relatives, can serve as personal representative.

    • A trust company incorporated under the laws of Florida, or a bank or savings and loan authorized and qualified to exercise fiduciary powers in Florida, can serve as personal representative of a Florida probate estate.

11. WHO HAS PREFERENCE TO BE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE ESTATE?  

    • If the decedent left a valid last will and testament, the designated personal representative nominated in the last will and testament has preference to serve.

    • If the decedent did not leave a valid last will and testament, the surviving spouse has preference, with second preference to the person selected by a majority in interest of the heirs of the probate estate.

12. WHY DOES THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE NEED A FLORIDA PROBATE ATTORNEY? 

Do I need an attorney to handle an estate?

In almost all instances the personal representative must be represented by a
Florida probate lawyer or attorney. Many legal issues arise, even in the simplest Florida probate estate administration.

The Florida 
probate attorney for the personal representative advises the personal representative on rights and duties under the Florida probate law, and represents the personal representative in probate estate proceedings in the Florida probate court. The Florida probate attorney for the personal representative is not the probate attorney for the beneficiaries.

A provision in a last will and testament mandating that a particular
Florida probate attorney or law firm be employed as probate attorney for the personal representative is not binding on the personal representative.

If you need the assistance of a Florida probate lawyer to help you with a probate estate in Orlando, or Orange County, Florida, please contact us toll free at 866-510-9099, or email us at
Info@TheOrlandoProbateLawyer.com.

13. HOW ARE ESTATE CREDITORS HANDLED IN A FLORIDA PROBATE ESTATE?


Prior to commencement of
Florida probate proceedings, a creditor can file a caveat with the Florida probate court. Upon publication of notice to creditors a creditor or other claimant may file with the Florida probate court a probate document called a "statement of claim" against the probate estate with the Clerk of the Circuit Court where the probate estate is being administered. This claim is generally required to be filed with the Florida probate court within the first three months of publication of a prescribed notice in a countywide newspaper. This three-month period is often referred to as the "non-claim period." The personal representative or any other interested person may file with the probate court an objection to the statement of claim, after which the claimant must file a separate independent lawsuit to pursue the claim.

The personal representative is required to use diligent efforts to give actual notice of the probate proceeding to "known or reasonably ascertainable" creditors, to afford them an opportunity to file claims. A valid claimant is not viewed as an adversary of the personal representative but rather must be treated fairly as a person interested in the probate estate until the claim has been satisfied or otherwise disposed of.

If you need a Florida probate lawyer to represent you for a creditor claim against a Florida probate estate in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

14. HOW IS THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE ("IRS") INVOLVED? 

For federal income tax purposes, death triggers two things. It ends the decedent's last tax year for purposes of filing a federal income tax return, and it establishes a new tax entity, the "estate."

The personal representative may be required to file the following returns, depending on income of the decedent, income of the probate estate and size of the probate estate:

    • Final Form 1040 income tax return, reporting income for the decedent's final tax year.

    • One or more Form 1041 income tax returns for the probate estate, reporting income for the probate estate.

    • Form 709 gift tax return(s), reporting certain gifts made by the decedent prior to death.

    •
Form 706
estate tax return, reporting the gross estate and deductions, depending upon the value of the gross estate.

The personal representative may be required to file other returns. Additionally, the personal representative has the responsibility to deal with issues arising from tax years prior to the decedent's death (including tax returns that were filed by the decedent or that should have been filed).

The personal representative has the responsibility to pay amounts due to the IRS from the decedent and the probate estate and may be personally liable for those taxes. If a federal estate tax return is required to be filed, an estate tax closing letter is necessary to clear title to
Florida real property, and in some instances in order to close the probate administration with the Florida probate court.

15. HOW IS THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE INVOLVED?  

The personal representative is required to send a copy of the probate inventory to the Florida Department of Revenue. A federal estate tax return is not required to be filed with the IRS, then the personal representative is required to record in the public records (and file in a formal estate administration) an Affidavit of No Florida Estate Tax Due. If a federal estate tax return is required to be filed with the IRS, then the personal representative is required to file a
Florida estate tax return, Form F-706, with the Florida Department of Revenue."

Regarding
Florida's intangible tax, the Florida Department of Revenue may review the inventory to determine whether the probate estate, or the decedent while alive, failed to file a required intangible tax return or to pay intangible tax.

For Florida probate estates required to file a
Florida estate tax return, a nontaxable certificate or a tax receipt from the Florida Department of Revenue is required in order to clear title to Florida real property and in order to close a formal probate administration.

16. WHAT RIGHTS DO THE SURVIVING FAMILY HAVE IN THE PROBATE ESTATE?  

Florida public policy protects the surviving spouse and certain surviving children from total disinheritance. Absent a pre-marital or post-marital agreement to the contrary, a surviving spouse may have exempt Florida homestead rights, Florida spousal elective share rights, family allowance rights, and exempt property rights. In addition, certain surviving children of the decedent may also have Florida exempt homestead rights, pretermitted child rights, family allowance rights, and exempt property rights. The existence and enforcement of these rights is often best handled by a Florida probate attorney or lawyer.

17. WHAT RIGHTS DO OTHER POTENTIAL BENEFICIARIES (OTHER THAN THE SURVIVING SPOUSE AND CHILDREN UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES) HAVE IN THE FLORIDA PROBATE ESTATE?  

Under
Florida probate law, as with most other states, a decedent may entirely disinherit other potential beneficiaries.

If you need an experienced Florida probate lawyer to represent you as a beneficiary of a Florida probate estate in Orlando, or Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

18. HOW LONG DOES A FLORIDA PROBATE TAKE?  

For Florida probate estates not required to file a federal estate tax return, the final accounting and papers to close the probate administration are due within 12 months of issuance of letters of administration. This period can be extended by the Florida probate court, after notice to interested persons.

The federal estate tax return is initially due nine months after death and may be extended for another six months, for a total of 15 months. If a federal estate tax return is required, the final accounting and papers to close the probate administration are due within 12 months from the date the tax return is due. This date is usually extended by the Florida probate court because often the IRS' review and acceptance of the estate tax return are not completed within that period.

Orlando probate estates that are not required to file a federal estate tax return and that do not involve estate litigation may often close in five or six months.

19. HOW ARE PROBATE FEES DETERMINED IN A FLORIDA PROBATE ADMINISTRATION? 

The personal representative, the
Florida probate attorney and other probate professionals whose services may be required in administering the Florida probate estate (such as appraisers and accountants) are entitled by Florida probate law to reasonable compensation.

The probate fee for the personal representative is usually determined in one of five ways: (1) as set forth in the last will and testament; (2) as set forth in a contract between the personal representative and the decedent; (3) as agreed among the personal representative and the persons who bear the impact of the probate fee; (4) as the amount presumed to be reasonable as calculated under Florida probate law if the amount is not objected to; or (5) as determined by the Florida probate judge, applying Florida probate law.

 Likewise, the probate fee for the
Florida probate attorney for the personal representative is usually determined (1) as agreed among the Florida probate attorney, the personal representative and the persons who bear the impact of the fee, (2) as the amount presumed to be reasonable calculated under Florida probate law, if the amount is not objected to, or (3) as determined by the Florida probate judge, applying Florida probate law.

20. WHAT ALTERNATIVES ARE AVAILABLE TO FORMAL ADMINISTRATION?  

Florida probate law provides for several alternate, abbreviated procedures other than Formal Probate Administration.

Summary Probate Administration is generally available if the value of the estate subject to probate in
Florida (less property which is exempt from the claims of creditors) is not more than $75,000 or the decedent has been dead for more than two years.

Under Summary Probate Administration, the persons who receive the probate estate assets remain liable for claims against the decedent for two years after the date of death. This period may be reduced in Summary Probate Administration by publication of notice in a local newspaper.

If you need the assistance of a Florida probate attorney with your summary probate administration in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please contact us toll free at 866-510-9099 or email us at
Info@TheOrlandoProbateLawyer.com.

Another alternative to Formal Probate Administration is "Disposition Without Administration." This is available if probate estate assets consist solely of exempt property (as defined by law and the Florida Constitution) and non-exempt personal property, the value of which does not exceed the combined total of up to $6,000 in funeral expenses, plus the amount of all reasonable and necessary medical and hospital expenses incurred in the last 60 days of the last illness.

If the decedent was not a
Florida resident at the time of death, an alternate procedure may be used to admit the will to record in Florida. This procedure is used to establish title to Florida real property. When admitted to record in any Florida county where the real estate is located, the "foreign will" serves to pass title to the real estate as if the will had been admitted to probate. This procedure is available only if either two years have passed from the decedent's death or the domiciliary personal representative has been discharged and there has been no probate estate administration in Florida.

21. WHAT IF THERE IS A REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST?
 
If the decedent created a
revocable living trust
, in certain circumstances, the trustee may be required to pay expenses of administration of the decedent's probate estate and enforceable claims of the decedent's creditors. In any event, the trustee is required to file in Orange County, Florida, or the county in which the decedent resided at death, a "notice of trust" with the Florida probate court where the decedent lived, giving information concerning the settlor and trustee.

If you need a Florida probate lawyer to represent you with regard to the administration of a revocable living trust in Orlando, Orange County, Florida, please call us toll free at 866-510-9099.

What is a revocable trust?

This material represents general legal information about Florida probate law. Since Florida probate law is continually changing, some provisions may be out of date. It is always best to consult an experienced Florida probate lawyer or attorney about your legal rights and responsibilities regarding your particular Orlando, Florida probate case.

Legal Notice and Disclaimer. The materials within this website are for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon by any individual. Communication of this information is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, the establishment of an attorney-client relationship. Internet usres and readers should not act upon this information without first seeking professional legal counsel for your particular circumstances. The information on this website is provided only as general information which may or may not reflect the most current legal information.


Florida probate lawyer directory of counties and cities in which Orlando Florida estate planning, asset protection planning, elder law, guardianship, nursing home abuse, and probate lawyers and attorneys offer Orlando Florida estate planning, asset protection planning, elder law, guardianship, nursing home abuse, and probate services:

Alachua  

Gainesville, Alachua, Hawthorne, High Springs, Waldo, Newberry, Micanopy

Bay  

Panama City, Panama City, Beach, Lynn Haven, Youngstown

Baker  

Macclenny, Glen Saint Mary

Bradford probate lawyers  

Starke, Brooker, Hampton

Brevard probate attorneys   

Cocoa, Cocoa Beach, Merritt Island, Titusville, Melbourne, Palm Bay, Cape Canaveral, Satellite Beach, Rockledge, Barefoot Bay, Indialantic, Malabar

Broward  

Ft. Lauderdale , Davie, Sunrise, Weston, Coral Springs, Pompano Beach, Hollywood, Hallendale, Plantation, Dania Beach, Coconut Creek, Deerfield Beach, Lauderhill, Lighthouse Point, Margate, Miramar, Oakland Park, Pembroke Pines, Tamarac, Wilton Manors, Hillsboro Beach, Pembroke Park, Cooper City, Port Everglades, Sea Ranch Lakes, Southwest Ranches

Calhoun  

Blountstown

Charlotte  

Punta Gorda, Charlotte, Port Charlotte, Palm Island

Citrus probate lawyers  

Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, Inverness

Clay  

Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Keystone Heights, Penny Farms

Collier  

Naples, Marco Island, Everglades City, Golden Gate, Immokalee, Palm River Estates, Ochopee

Columbia  

Lake City, Fort White            

DeSoto probate attorneys  

Arcadia, Brownville, Fort Ogden, Hull, Pine Level, Platt

Dixie  

Cross City, Horseshoe Beach, Old Town

Duval

Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach

Escambia  

Pensacola

Flagler  

Palm Coast, Flagler Beach, Bunnell, Beverly Beach, Marineland            

Franklin  

Apalachicola

Gadsden  

Quincy, Chattahoochee

Gilchrest  

Trenton

Glades  

Moorehaven

Gulf  

Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka

Hamilton  

Jasper, White Springs

Hardee  

Wauchula

Hendry probate lawyers  

Clewiston, LaBelle

Hernando probate attorneys   

Brooksville, Weeki Wachi

Highlands  

Avon Park, Sebring, Lake Placid, Leisure Lakes

Hillsborough  

Tampa, Plant City, Temple Terrace, Apollo Beach, Brandon, Lutz, Ruskin, Sun City Center, Riverview, Dover, Thonotosassa, Ybor City

Holmes  

Bonifay

Indian River  

Vero Beach, Indian River Shores, Fellsmere, Sebastian

Jackson  

Marianna

Jefferson  

Monticello

Lafayette  

Mayo

Lake County probate attorneys  

Altoona, Clermont, Eustis, Fruitland Park, Lady lake, Leesburg, Minneola, Mount Dora, Tavares, Umatilla

Lee County

Fort Myers, Bonita Springs, Cape Coral, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel, Boca Grande, Estero, San Carlos Park, Lehigh Acres, Waterway Estates

Leon  

Tallahassee

Levy  

Bronson, Cedar Key, Chiefland, Williston, Yankeetown

Liberty  

Bristol

Madison  

Madison

Manatee  

Bradenton, Anna Maria Island, Bradenton, Holmes Beach, Longboat Key, Palmetto, Myakka City

Marion county probate lawyers  

Ocala, Leesburg, Belleview, Citra, Dunnellon, Salt Springs, Weirsdale

Martin  

Stuart, Sewall’s Point, Hobe Sound, Jensen Beach, Jupiter Island, Ocean Breeze Park, Palm City

Miami-Dade  

Miami, Coral Gables, Coconut Grove, South Miami, Kendall, Homestead, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Miami Beach, Hialeah, Miami Shores, Miami Lakes, Aventura, Bal Harbour, Bay Harbor Islands, Hialeah Gardens, Key Biscayne, Pinecrest, Surfside, Cutler Bay, Doral, Golden Beach, Indian Village, Islandia, Medley, Miami Gardens, North Bay Village, Sunny Isles Beach, Sweetwater, Virginia Gardens, Florida City, Goulds, Biscayne Park

Monroe  

Key West, Islamorada, Key Largo, Marathon, Big Pine Key, Key Colony Beach, Sugarloaf Key, Tavernier

Nassau  

Fernandina Beach, Amelia Island, Hilliard, Yulee, Callahan

Okaloosa  

Fort Walton Beach, Niceville, Cinco Bayou, Destin, Shalimar Valparaiso

Okeechobee  

Okeechobee

Orange County probate lawyers  

Orlando probate attorneys, Lake Buena Vista, Apopka, Edgewood, Maitland probate lawyers, Ocoee, Windemere, Winter Garden, Winter Park probate attorneys, Zellwood

Osceola County probate attorneys  

Kissimmee probate lawyers, St. Cloud, Celebration

Palm Beach  

Palm Beach, West Palm Beach, North Palm Beach, Lake Worth, Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Boynton Beach, Greenacres, Highland Beach, Hypoluxo, Juno Beach, Jupiter, Lake Park, Lantana, Ocean Ridge, Palm Beach Gardens, Royal Palm Beach, Wellington, Pahokee, Tequesta, Riviera Beach, Loxahatchee, Manalapan, Ocean Ridge, Glen Ridge

Pasco  

New Port Richey, Bayonet Point, Gulf Harbors, Dade City, Holiday, Hudson, Land O’Lakes, Odessa, St. Leo, Zephyrhills

Pinellas  

St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Dunedin, Gulfport, Largo, Oldsmar, Pinellas Park, Safety Harbor, Tarpon Springs, Treasure Island, Belleair, Madeira Beach, North Redington Beach, Seminole, Indian Rocks Beach                              

Polk County probate lawyers  

Lakeland, Auburndale. Bartow, Eagle Lake, Fort Meade, Haines City, Lake Alfred, Lake Wales, Winter Haven, Frostproof, Polk City, Highland Park, Indian Lake Estates

Putnam  

Palatka, Interlachen

Santa Rosa  

Gulf Breeze, Milton

Sarasota  

Sarasota, Longboat Key, North Port, Venice

Seminole County probate attorneys  

Altamonte Springs probate attorneys, Casselberry, Lake Mary, Longwood, Oviedo, Sanford probate lawyers, Winter Springs

St. Johns  

St. Augustine, St. Augustine Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Nocatee, Crescent City, Melrose, Pomona Park, Welaka

St. Lucie

Fort Pierce, Port St. Lucie

Sumter  

Wildwood, Bushnell, The Villages

Suwannee  

Live Oak

Taylor  

Perry, Steinhatchee

Union  

Lake Butler

Volusia County probate lawyers  

Daytona Beach, Ormond Beach, New Smyrna Beach, Deland, Deltona, Edgewater, Holly Hill, Ponce Inlet, Port Orange

Wakulla   

 

Walton  

DeFuniak Springs, Seaside

Washington  

Chipley

 








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